Creative Writing

Another example of the great work produced here at WMC in the Creative Writing courses. (click here for course info)

 

Remember the beauty of simplicity. Great power resides in all those one-syllable Anglo-Saxon words.

Sebastian’s story uses only one-syllable words:

 

The Lone Shoe

by Sebastian Kola-Bankole

On the night of the full moon, I see the man in front of me get hit by a big red bus. I lean on the bus stop sign and hold my breath. My heart pounds in my chest and I know I should try to help him. I try to move but I freeze. I try to run from the scene but my legs say nay.

I watch as a pool of blood, the hue of good red wine, seeps out from the back of the bus. I heave and retch as the ooze spreads, slow and thick. I think I can see a shoe, his left one. It is brown and its heel torn. It lies on the side of the road, this sad lone shoe, right next to a bare foot, ripped from its leg. I can’t tear my eyes from this dire sight. I want to leave but I stand there, fixed to the spot, dead still.

 

 

…..and an

Acrostic Poem

by Sebastian Kola-Bankole

 

Stayed alive to tell the tale

Even when near death he lay

Beneath a truck, his bones were crushed

All feeling below did turn to mush

Still he fought to stay alive

Through it all, he did survive

In the time that’s passed since then

As he falls, he stands again

Never shall he ever doubt, from all that pain, his strength did sprout

 

 

Creative Writing

Here are some more fantastic examples of the Flash Fiction task from the Creative Writing classes here at WMC (click here for course info)

 

Waiting. I’m waiting. Always waiting.

The automated, robot voice on the end of the phone explains its dizzying array of options.

I’m waiting for my details to pop up on the monitor of a remote, invisible, call worker who just wants to go home.

I’m waiting to hear my personal details read back to confirm who I am.

Yes, I am me.

Twenty minutes later, the monotone, script-reading voice, finally asks for my payment details.

I’m going for a coffee I tell him.

He can wait for me.

 

Mark Bloom

 

It was that time in the festivities when bad dancing was rife on the dance floor. Perched on a spindly chair, I sipped at my cocktail. He loomed over me, red faced, swaying wet lipped:

“Wan’ dance?” he said extending a plump, pink hand.

“Rubbish dancer,” I said through gritted teeth. His hand descended, grasping my arm, forcefully lifting me, simultaneously spilling my drink and overturning the table.

“Oops!” he said. Now level with his chins and about to let fly with some righteous indignation, I suddenly registered his identity and saw over his shoulder, huddled in a corner in a froth of white netting and sobbing, the Bride. 

 

Sue Higgs

 

**

 

He smiled at me from platform 3, then the 10.30 Express passed and he was gone.

 

**

 

White dress and veil. Black suit. Ring. ‘I don’t,’ he said.

 

Kate Emmett

 

**

 

After the first day of the Creative Writing course she saw a light in her future. She was changing into a beautiful butterfly and flying into the sky.

 

Vincy Kam Wai Lau

Ollie and His friends

Last year we were contacted by a local author Joe Morris looking for illustration for his new children’s book. This opportunity was given to the Foundation Diploma learners and Veronique Shamhong produced some lovely illustrations for the book. The book is now published and we were thrilled to receive a copy!

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The Big Draw – London life

The Big Draw: Exploring London Life though Art

On Saturday 16th February 2019 local Camden residents and college learners were invited to come and join Foundation Diploma and Childcare learners in the production of a huge collaborative drawing depicting London life in all its diversity. This event was part of the International Big Draw festival ((click here for more Big Draw info)

The piece starts at the top with prominent and well known London landmarks, what everyone would think of when thinking of London, but then moves down in to local landmarks and portraits of individual’s living spaces: Our local London. The image finishes with self-portraits of the participants showing the range of individuals who make up London Life at the college.

Contact annas@wmcollege.ac.uk for any queries

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the final piece close up:

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and some pictures from the day:

Inspired by Ruskin

Learners from all over the college have submitted A4 size works inspired by the life and work of John Ruskin.

John Ruskin was one of the original founding members of the Working Men’s College over 160 years ago.

To celebrate the bicentenary of his birth we will are  holding an exhibition of work inspired by his legacy.

Inspiration has come from the wide range of his interests and practices throughout his life. From  his love of the landscape that surrounded him, his ideas about the relationship between truth and beauty, the cabinets of curiosities he used to teach drawing, to the social importance of arts education that he championed during his life, and even portraits of the man himself.

”Art is not a study of positive reality, it is the seeking for ideal truth. Life without industry is guilt, and industry without art is brutality”

 

The exhibition will be on display in the Ruskin Gallery At the Working Men’s college till the 8th of February 2019